Postcard from Oxford, England

Sunday, April 7, 2019


Oxford reminded me a bit of Bath, because of its colors. We were well into summer now though, so it was bright and sunny for the most part!



We originally planned to visit both Cambridge and Oxford, but had to choose one at the end. We went for Oxford instead. I'll be back for Cambridge.

It is no secret that the city of Oxford revolves mainly around its University. There are a lot of colleges standing here to this day, but we only got to see those that were accessible for visitors.


I peaked through a covered market and was fascinated by this mural. So much play of colors!



I was grateful to have gone to this exhibit. Whenever we hear of someone famous, we almost always think of their accomplishments and what they were able to contribute during their time here on earth. I realized though that if we choose to remain with that kind of knowledge about someone, we would miss out the quirks and their characteristics that make them human. It's through someone's humanness that we can relate and appreciate someone more, and therefore feel inspired. I think that's a more meaningful way of knowing someone. 

At a time and age where we tend to idealize/put someone on a pedestal because of what they choose to show to the world through social media, it would actually be nicer to just sit down and have a chit chat, to know what drives a certain person, to know the kinds of challenges they face and how they cope. Because that's raw, and real.

Okay, moving on, what did I like about Tolkien so much and what stuck with me the most? The fact that he used to write to his children when they were still small and pretended that he was Santa Claus. :") I was also amazed by his illustrations. He drew and wrote non-stop. He drew on his books, notebooks, newspapers, everywhere. The fact that his brilliant mind can come up with different worlds and magical creatures, I think will always be beyond me. 


Bodleian libraries, known to be the oldest and largest library system in the UK.

Stepping in filled me with awe already, knowing that this is one of the leading and oldest universities in the world. Let me please gather my brain cells to comprehend this.



To get around the colleges, students have to walk or take bikes. You can take a car, but... people here love to walk. And I love them for loving walking.


Radcliffe Camera! One of Oxford's iconic libraries.



Bridge of Sighs. I am aware there is one in Italy, but this one's pretty short too so it counts!



Nyarrrrr !! Oh man I was definitely fascinated by these angry heads.





I SO WISH writing and sending letters was still a thing. Everything is given to us in an instant, thus our sense of entitlement has inflated as well. Like, people expect you to reply right away once they message you online and if you don't reply right away they start assigning meaning to why you're not replying a s a p . . . : - (


Bookstores, lots of them. People love to sketch more than taking photos, too. 


Take note, my dear friends. 



And then here we are, the Ashmolean museum. It is Oxford University's museum, and known as well to be the first University Museum.

Some artifacts I found interesting:


Lawrence of Arabia's cape and dagger. He was a commendable diplomat during the war with the Turks.


This is Elias Ashmole, the museum's founder. I like this portrait of him; so much sass.


I took a lot of photos of these. I can dedicate one whole blog entry just for these wares. I'll think about it.


Poccahontas' dad's cape / Powhatan's mantle


Ashmolean museum is open everyday from 10AM - 5PM. Admission is free. 

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I also entitled this blog entry as such because I DID get to buy a postcard from Oxford. I found it in a thrift shop. I didn't mail it to myself though because I have trust issues with our local mailing system. I'm afraid they might lose it forever.


This postcard spoke to me. It's a watercolor print of Hyde park, a woman strolling around with her child and pet dog. Its print on the back described the life of the painter, Rose Maynard Barton (1856-1929), who frequented Dublin and London to paint many scenes of city parks, monuments, and streets.

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Hope you're having a lovely Sunday, wherever you are. ♡♡♡♡


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2 comments

  1. Some really lovely pictures! I've never visited Oxford, perhaps it needs to go onto my to do list!

    Thanks for sharing :)

    The Modern Bohemian

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Rachel! Oxford is truly a lovely place, hope you get to go someday!

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